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Win “C.S. Lewis: A Biography of Friendship” by Colin Duriez

May 11, 2013

Bio of Friendship (Duriez)Get a chance to win a copy of the latest book by Colin Duriez, C.S. Lewis: A Biography of Friendship. It’s not officially out in the U.S. until June 1st, but you could win it now! Also, be looking for a podcast interview with the author to be posted here this Monday from my All About Jack site.

Please note, as with most of my contests, it is ONLY open to those living in the U.S. (sorry, but it’s the publisher who mails the prize and they set the limits). See complete rules below.

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO TO ENTER is simply leave a comment below about ANY fact about Lewis that you know, or can find. If you need one check out my facts on Twitter. Deadline to enter is Thursday, May 16th at 6 p.m. Eastern.

FIVE random individuals from those who enter will be the winners! You will be notified by email, so leave an address you check frequently (it will be from lewisminute (at) gmail.com).

If you want to learn more about Colin Duriez you can read a recent interview done by Kelly Belmonte at the ALL NINE blog.

– – – –

****COMPLETE RULES****

  • Only those living in the U.S. are eligible to win.
  • Prizes are promised by the publisher and are agreed to be given by them…so they determine how far they will mail a prize.
  • If you are one of the random winners you must reply within 48 hours of notification or another person will be selected (email will come from lewisminute (at) gmail.com)
  • Entries are assigned a number and a random number generator is used to pick the winners.
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27 Comments leave one →
  1. Janie Greer permalink
    May 11, 2013 10:41 am

    C.S. Lewis’ concept of Joy is one that all should come to know!

  2. May 11, 2013 10:46 am

    Jack’s mother died on his father’s 45th birthday – August 23, 1908. (My father was born on that date 35 years later.)

  3. May 11, 2013 11:09 am

    One of the very last books Lewis read before he died, along with rereading many of his favorite Greek and Latin Classics, was the French Novel “Dangerous Acquaintances” by Pierre-Ambroise De Laclos.

  4. May 11, 2013 11:31 am

    Clive Staple Lewis was born on November 29, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland.

  5. May 11, 2013 11:31 am

    I want to win! Here’s something most don’t know (and probably don’t care about!).
    In the mid-1930s, C.S. Lewis wrote a reference letter for a man to get a job as a schoolmaster, Eddie Edmonds. Eddie was one of Lewis’ lit students, and the letter helped him on his way toward a DPhil and a PhD, and he founded the school of education at the University of Prince Edward Island. He went to my church, and died recently.
    Nice guy.

  6. May 11, 2013 12:02 pm

    Like Lewis and Joy, we also met as friends-turned-to great love when we were both older. I think of Lewis having Joy for only five years and that makes me cherish every moment with my fiancee that much more. CS Lewis’ LL and W book inspired my fiancee to dedicate his life to Christ after the death of his wife and child in the 1980s. Inspired by Narnia, he has written a deeply charming series of ebooks about the further adventures of talking animals. (www.narniahome.com, but I did not write that for a plug–it is a labor of love only!
    He, John Burkitt, is also a moderator for the site NarniaFans.com, and is acquainted with his son. So Lewis is a huge part of our lives!
    As for me, I was raised by agnostic parents, so knowing that a great intellect like “Jack” was converted out of unbelief, with some help from some fellow writers, to one of the greatest professors of Christianity, has often been a source of great inspiration for both of us!
    I am glad to know about your book, podcast, , and you. Even if I do not win your book I will download it for my Kindle.
    Thanks for all your work!

  7. Anne Marr permalink
    May 11, 2013 12:38 pm

    When he was a boy, Lewis was fascinated by the stories of Beatrix Potter. He and his brother Warnie invented a story land they called “Boxen”, which was inhabited by anthropomorphic animals.

  8. May 11, 2013 12:58 pm

    C.S. Lewis started to write The Magician’s Nephew and partway through the writing process scrapped the story before he rewrote it later.

    C.S. Lewis also had difficulty writing The Screwtape Letters because it was hard to think in the dark and distorted perspective of Screwtape.

  9. May 11, 2013 2:00 pm

    Hey, William. Thanks for the contest. Fact: his upstairs desk in the Kilns was in the middle of the little room at the top of the staircase, parallel with the fireplace You would walk past the front of the desk, with the little window to your right, to get to the bedroom on that end of the house. May the best Lewis fans win! 🙂

  10. May 11, 2013 7:02 pm

    Lewis and Tolkien challenged each other to write a sci-fi and time travel story, respectively. This led to Lewis’ Cosmic Trilogy (whose philologist hero is said to be based on Tolkien). Tolkien, alas, never finished his time travel poem!

  11. Dan Church permalink
    May 11, 2013 8:17 pm

    Lewis gave away the majority (many times entirety) of his wages working for BBC (war time talks/mere Christianity) to those in need – even to students at Oxford to help pay for school.

  12. Edward Coffman permalink
    May 12, 2013 12:20 am

    Lewis mother’s madian name was Hamilton. I am descended from a Lady Elizabeth Hamilton who ran of with the palace guard named Mills (ok fictional story I know) But she was a Hamilton so clearly Lewis and I are directly related. Great minds run in the family.

  13. Rhonda Brunea permalink
    May 12, 2013 12:43 pm

    Lewis originally published A Grief Observed under the pen name N.W. Clerk. All of his friends called him Jack … and so do I.

  14. May 12, 2013 2:11 pm

    Lewis loved nature — saw his Lord in it: “Any patch of sunlight in a wood will show you something about the sun which you could never get from reading books on astronomy.” (CS Lewis)

  15. May 12, 2013 9:50 pm

    C. S. Lewis referred to himself as a “gobbler.” He liked o gobble his food.

  16. Bill Leachman permalink
    May 13, 2013 9:30 am

    C.S. Lewis fact: Lewis gave talks to the RAF during 1941.

  17. Eric Redmond permalink
    May 13, 2013 9:50 am

    The Magician’s Nephew took the longest to write of any of the Narnia books.

  18. May 13, 2013 11:33 am

    Lewis turned down writting articles for Christianity Today (1955), believing that the war time had dramtically changed society. The enemies Lewis then fought were comfort and post-war apathy (1946-1952). To battle both, he aimed at engaging his readers’ imagination, using this as the vehicle to smuggle theology behind enemy lines.

  19. May 13, 2013 12:20 pm

    The name of the large, black dog Lewis own from about 1927 to 1937 was “Baron Papworth.” On the famous 1927 ride to the Whipsnade Zoo, while Jack and Warnie rode on a motorcycle, Papworth joined Mrs. Moore, Maureen and an Irish friend in a much slower car.

  20. May 13, 2013 9:06 pm

    C.S. Lewis was a terrible driver and rarely drove a car.

  21. Jim Brown permalink
    May 14, 2013 11:09 am

    C.S. Lewis and his older brother Warren H. Lewis were born in Belfast, Ireland. When C.S. Lewis’ dog Jacksie was run over and killed by car when Clive was for years old he declared that his name was now Jacksie. At first, he would answer to no other name, but later accepted Jack, the name by which he was known to friends and family for the rest of his life.

  22. Mary Mueller permalink
    May 15, 2013 1:08 am

    Lewis wrote essentially all of “The Pilgrim’s Regress” during a two week vacation in 1932 at the home of his childhood friend, Arthur Greeves. Published in 1933, it was the first book he wrote after his conversion, and the first prose work he published.

  23. Thomas Briner permalink
    May 15, 2013 7:45 pm

    C.S. Lewis died on 22 November 1963. The same day President Kennedy was assassinated

Trackbacks

  1. AAJ Podcast: C.S. Lewis: A Biography of Friendship (Colin Duriez) | C.S. Lewis Minute
  2. Fact: May 11 | Essential C.S. Lewis

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